Our Mission

Our mission is to foster purposeful and meaningful lives for those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias through the use of the Montessori Inspired Lifestyle® Approach.

We have over 30 years’ experience in the field of senior care. Our constant focus is on service with integrity, upholding the dignity of our residents at every stage of aging, providing collaborative and detailed care planning to enhance the whole life of each resident. These are core values that guide each day at Iuditas’ Memory Care.

We have over 30 years’ experience in the field of senior care. Our constant focus is on service with integrity, upholding the dignity of our residents at every stage of aging, providing collaborative and detailed care planning to enhance the whole life of each resident. These are core values that guide each day at Iuditas’ Memory Care.

People Belong Together

It’s what we all feel instinctively – and science backs it up. A growing body of research shows that those who live in a caring, connected environment enjoy greater health and well-being than those who are isolated or neglected. At Iuditas’, we are dedicated to creating a vibrant where older adults realize healthier, happier, more meaningful lives – trading in loneliness for the company of neighbors, inactivity for movement and dullness for purposeful engagement. We work to foster a common sense of purpose, belonging and respect to create a warm and welcoming environment for those who call us home.

Our Staff

Our loving staff are dedicated to the wellbeing, satisfaction, and happiness of all the residents. Our tailored care focuses on maintaining the health and well-being of our residents. Our highly trained staff consists of health care professionals and specialists in our community who offer support and expertise in a variety of areas to provide the best quality care possible.


Family Support

Family involvement is encouraged and welcomed whenever possible. It’s important that relationships be maintained, so families are invited to visit any time and are included in themed activities, dinners, special celebrations and, of course, family nights. As members of families ourselves, we understand the desire to be there for each other in times of need. Our team is trained to value each resident as family, recognizing their personal preferences and individual needs. We know firsthand how difficult helping a loved one can be, but we are here to help make it easier by providing experienced care, loving staff and a helping hand.

Making it Feel Like Home

We are a family owned and operated boutique memory care community that serves seniors dealing with a range of conditions including Alzheimer’s and other memory care issues. Our new building was designed to provide a warm, safe, and supportive environment for all residents. At Iuditas’ Memory Care you will find experienced staff that have created an atmosphere of trust and support. We offer detailed care, meticulous and personalized to each resident’s needs. The wide array of activities are designed to engage the mental, physical, and emotional facets of each resident. Our menu is nutritious and well balanced following the dietary recommendations provided by each resident’s medical care team. Our facility features 24-hour care, a chef kitchen that is used heavily in preparation of your meals, large dining room, an array of fun activities, a hair salon, and much more.

When a loved one is diagnosed with dementia, life changes.

Living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia presents a myriad of challenges for which most families are unprepared. The demands placed on caregivers are intense and can seriously impact the caregiver’s lifestyle and personal health.

What Is Dementia?

Dementia simply means a decline in memory and is a general term used to describe a wide range of conditions and symptoms. Alzheimer’s disease afflicts between 60% to 80% of all individuals experiencing dementia. Most changes in the brain that cause dementia are permanent and progressive. However, some conditions which cause dementia symptoms can be reversed, including depression, side effects of medication and vitamin deficiencies. There are other forms of dementia linked to types of dementia that affect a significant segment of the population. These people may benefit from living in a memory care community.

Types Of Dementia

Symptoms of dementia vary by individual, but for the condition to be considered dementia, at least two of the following core mental functions should be considerably impaired: memory, communication and language, ability to focus, reasoning and judgment, and visual perception. Dementia is caused by damage to brain cells, and the reasons for the damage can also vary greatly.

  • Alzheimer's Disease

  • Frontotemporal Dementia

  • Mild Cognitive Impairment

  • Parkinson's Disease Dementia

  • Early-Onset Dementia

  • Lewy Body Dementia

  • Mixed Dementia

  • Vascular Dementia

Planning And Placement

Planning should start when an Alzheimer’s or related dementia diagnosis is made. Research indicates early detection and prompt intervention can preserve remaining abilities and slow progression. Iuditas’ Memory Care is dedicated to meeting your loved one’s unique needs in a safe and comfortable environment while maintaining dignity and quality of life. Our residents will experience an environment that preserves the warmth, caring and comforts of home.

What Is Alzheimer’s Disease?

Alzheimer’s disease is a form of dementia which affects memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms of Alzheimer’s develop slowly, but progressively worsen over time. There is no cure for Alzheimer’s, but treatment for symptoms is available to improve a person’s quality of life. Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed through a complete medical assessment including a thorough medical history, mental status testing and physical and neurological exams, and other tests to rule out other causes of dementia-like symptoms.

COMMON WARNING SIGNS

  • Memory loss
  • Trouble planning or problem solving
  • Difficulty completing normal tasks at home, work or leisure
  • Confusion
  • Disorientation
  • Difficulty understanding spatial relationships
  • Trouble with words or speaking
  • Poor judgment
  • Changes in mood or personality
  • Withdrawing socially

What Should I Expect As A Caregiver?

For caregivers, understanding common behavior changes of someone living with Alzheimer’s is important. A person with Alzheimer’s may need help with planning their day and remembering appointments, or even simple tasks like dressing and bathing. As the disease progresses, a person with Alzheimer’s may become frustrated, anxious or embarrassed by their cognitive decline. A caregiver may need to provide emotional and physical support, as well as encouragement. Individuals with Alzheimer’s may become restless, experience rapid mood swings, or wander. Knowing how to balance a person’s safety and independence becomes more difficult as the disease progresses.

How Can We Help?

Meeting the demands of a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease can be difficult and seem impossible. At Iuditas’, memory care is all we do. We offer the following services dedicated to those living with memory impairments, their family members, caregivers and health care professionals.

  • Support, education and information for caregivers and family members
  • An environment that helps to keep residents safe and as independent as possible
  • Staff specially trained on caring for residents living with memory loss
  • Structured, engaging programs, ongoing throughout the day, seven days a week
  • Programs personalized for all levels of dementia and focused on what the resident can do, capitalizing on lifelong experiences and familiar routines

Overview

Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) accounts for about 10-20 percent of dementia cases. It is recognized as one of the most common presenile dementias (meaning it occurs in a younger population).

What Is Frontotemporal Dementia?

FTD causes cell damage in the frontal lobe (behind the eyes) and temporal lobe (behind the ears), shrinking tissue and reducing brain functions such as judgment, emotions, speaking, understanding and movement. FTD is relatively more common in the younger population, with people often developing symptoms in their 50s or early 60s. FTD is comprised of multiple disorders with different core symptoms.

Diagnosing FTD is based on a physician’s judgment after a complete medical assessment including a thorough medical history, mental status testing and physical and neurological exams. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect shrinkage in the brain’s frontal and temporal lobes, which is a hallmark of FTD.

CORE SYMPTOMS

  • Behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) impacts personality and behavior. Subtle changes in personal relationships, interaction with others and mood may be noticeable in the beginning, and are sometimes mistaken for depression. As bvFTD progresses, a person may withdraw socially, lose restraint in personal relations and social activities, and have poor judgment or decision-making abilities.
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) affects language skills in the beginning and behavior as the disorder advances. A person can speak, but uses broad general terms such as “animal” when referring to a “dog.” Comprehension of language may also become a problem as the disease advances. They may struggle to find words, or speech may seem delayed. The ability to read and write may also decline.
  • Frontotemporal movement disorders affects involuntary, automatic muscle functions, and impairs language and behavior. A person may become shaky, notice muscle rigidity and spasms and loss of coordination. A person may have trouble with walking and balance, may fall frequently and notice muscle stiffness or affected eye movement.

What Should I Expect As A Caregiver?

For caregivers, understanding common behavior changes of persons living with FTD is important. A person with FTD may struggle to speak or carry on a normal conversation. As the disease progresses, a person with FTD may become frustrated, anxious or embarrassed by their cognitive decline. A caregiver may need to provide emotional and physical support, as well as encouragement. Individuals with FTD may become forgetful, restless or experience rapid mood swings as the disease advances. Knowing how to balance a person’s safety and independence becomes more difficult as the disease progresses.

How Can We Help?

Meeting the demands of a loved one with Frontotemporal Dementia can be difficult and seem impossible. Memory care is all we do. We offer the following services dedicated to those living with memory impairments.

  • Support, education and information for caregivers and family members.
  • An environment that helps to keep residents safe and as independent as possible.
  • Staff specially trained on caring for residents living with memory loss.
  • Structured, engaging programs, 10 hours a day.
  • Programs personalized for all levels of dementia and focused on what the resident can do, capitalizing on lifelong experiences and familiar routines.

Overview

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) causes a slight but noticeable decrease in cognitive abilities including memory, language, thinking and judgement. Approximately 15–20% of people aged 65 or older have MCI.

What Is Mild Cognitive Impairment?

This population is has an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. For persons living with MCI, their close friends and family members are usually the first to notice changes, but may not think these changes are significant enough to warrant changes in daily routines and activities.

COMMON WARNING SIGNS

  • Forgetfulness of dates, recent conversations and events
  • Inability to make sound decisions
  • Trouble judging time
  • Difficulty executing tasks
  • Increased anxiety and/or depression
  • Apathy
  • Increased irritability or aggression

What Should I Expect As A Caregiver?

For caregivers, understanding common behavior changes of persons living with FTD is important. A person with FTD may struggle to speak or carry on a normal conversation. As the disease progresses, a person with FTD may become frustrated, anxious or embarrassed by their cognitive decline. A caregiver may need to provide emotional and physical support, as well as encouragement. Individuals with FTD may become forgetful, restless or experience rapid mood swings as the disease advances. Knowing how to balance a person’s safety and independence becomes more difficult as the disease progresses.

How Can We Help?

For persons living with MCI, Iuditas’ encourages participation in small and large group activities to stimulate socialization and engagement. Small group activities shared with persons who have similar interests and preferences would stimulate remaining cognitive abilities. Exercise activities would also be encouraged as this type of programming would maintain good physical health and would provide opportunities to socialize in a safe environment.

Overview

Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD) is an impairment in thinking and reasoning that affects 50-80% of people diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Patients with Parkinson’s disease dementia often experience the same symptoms as Alzheimer’s patients, in addition to sleep disturbances, visual hallucinations, muscle rigidity or other Parkinsonism physical and cognitive impairments.

What Is Parkinson’s Disease Dementia?

The brain changes caused by Parkinson’s disease begin in a part of the brain that controls movement. As Parkinson’s disease progresses, it often begins to cause cognitive impairments due to protein deposits found in the brainstem that deplete dopamine levels. There is no cure or treatment to slow or stop brain deterioration from Parkinson’s disease dementia. It’s important to work closely with a physician to determine which medications work best for you or your loved ones.

Diagnosing Parkinson’s disease dementia is based on a physician’s judgment after a complete medical assessment including a thorough medical history, mental status testing and physical and neurological exams. A PDD diagnosis may be made when a person is originally diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease based on movement symptoms and dementia symptoms do not appear until a year or more later.

COMMON WARNING SIGNS

  • Problems with memory
  • Perception
  • Thinking and behavior
  • Trouble speaking, confusion
  • Hallucinations
  • Changes in mood and personality
  • Muscle rigidity
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Tremors

What Should I Expect As A Caregiver?

For caregivers, understanding common behavior changes of persons living with Parkinson’s disease dementia is important. A person with PDD may need help with planning their day and remembering appointments or even simple tasks like dressing and bathing. As the disease progresses, a person with PDD may become frustrated, anxious or embarrassed by their cognitive decline. A caregiver may need to provide emotional and physical support, as well as encouragement. Individuals with Parkinson’s disease dementia may become restless, experience rapid mood swings, or wander. Knowing how to balance a person’s safety and independence becomes more difficult as the disease progresses.

How Can We Help?

Meeting the demands of a loved one with Parkinson’s disease can be difficult and seem impossible. Memory care is all we do. We offer the following services dedicated to those living with memory impairments.

  • Support, education and information for caregivers and family members.
  • An environment that helps to keep residents safe and as independent as possible.
  • Staff specially trained on caring for residents living with memory loss.
  • Structured, engaging programs, 10 hours a day.
  • Programs personalized for all levels of dementia and focused on what the resident can do, capitalizing on lifelong experiences and familiar routines.

Overview

Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD) usually occurs in persons prior to age 65. Up to 5% of the over five million people living with Alzheimer’s are diagnosed in their 30s, 40s and 50s.

What Is Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease?

Approximately 13% of all early-onset Alzheimer’s disease cases are hereditary. On average, the duration for this form of dementia ranges anywhere from three to 20 years. Symptoms for this form of dementia manifest at work or home and are often ignored or attributed to another factor because of the person’s young age. Symptoms include impaired ability to learn, re-learn, recall, plan, organize or sequence. They may also have an inability to identify and recognize. Personality and behavioral symptoms include anxiety and wandering.

COMMON WARNING SIGNS

  • Memory loss
  • Trouble planning or organizing
  • Difficulty with recognition
  • Increased anxiety
  • Wandering

How Can We Help?

For persons living with EOAD, Iuditas’ utilizes programming concentrating on their interests and abilities which gives flexibility and independence. Lifestyle programming is used to devise a strategy to keep individuals living with EOAD engaged and socialized. Small groups with like interests and hobbies are introduced to create a sense of belonging and community.

Overview

Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), is estimated to effect approximately 1.4 million Americans. LBD includes patients from both dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease dementia diagnoses. People with LBD often experience the same symptoms as Alzheimer’s patients, in addition to sleep disturbances, visual hallucinations, muscle rigidity or other Parkinsonism physical and cognitive impairments.

What Is Lewy Body Dementia?

Lewy body dementia (LBD) is caused by abnormal protein deposits that disrupt the brain’s normal functioning. The proteins found in the brain stem deplete dopamine levels, causing Parkinson’s-like symptoms. LBD symptoms include problems with memory, perception, thinking and behavior. Symptoms of LBD vary from person to person, and may fluctuate at any moment, or any day. LBD greatly impacts a person’s daily life and ability to function independently. There is no cure for LBD, but treatment for symptoms is available to improve a person’s quality of life.

Diagnosing of LBD is based on a physician’s judgment after a complete medical assessment including a thorough medical history, mental status testing and physical and neurological exams. A LBD diagnosis may be made when dementia symptoms consistent with LBD develop prior to movement symptoms, when both dementia symptoms and movement symptoms are present or when dementia symptoms develop within a year of movement symptoms.

COMMON WARNING SIGNS

  • Memory loss
  • Trouble planning or problem solving
  • Difficulty completing normal tasks
  • Confusion
  • Frequent falls
  • Muscle rigidity
  • Disorientation
  • Difficulty understanding spatial relationships
  • Trouble with words or speaking
  • Poor judgment
  • Changes in mood or personality
  • Hallucinations
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Tremors

What Should I Expect As A Caregiver?

For caregivers, understanding common behavior changes of persons living with LBD is important. A person with LBD may need help with planning their day and remembering appointments or even simple tasks like dressing and bathing. As the disease progresses, a person with LBD may become frustrated, anxious or embarrassed by their cognitive decline. A caregiver may need to provide emotional and physical support, as well as encouragement. Individuals with LBD may become restless, experience rapid mood swings, or wander. Knowing how to balance a person’s safety and independence becomes more difficult as the disease progresses.

Overview

It is not uncommon to have more than one cause for dementia. Mixed dementia or “Dementia—multi-factorial” is a condition in which abnormalities of more than one type of dementia occur simultaneously. The most common forms often include Alzheimer’s with Vascular Dementia, Dementia with Lewy bodies, or in some cases, brain changes associated with all three.

What Is Vascular Dementia?

Vascular dementia can occur as a result of a severe stroke or multiple small strokes which affect the blood vessels inside the brain. When a stroke occurs, no matter how minor, it reduces the amount of oxygen and nutrients getting to the brain cells, resulting in impairment. These symptoms may occur at the same time as physical stroke symptoms, such as difficulty walking or paralysis on one side of the face or body. While vascular dementia does not cause Alzheimer’s disease, or vice versa, it is not uncommon for a person to have both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia.

If a physician suspects vascular dementia, they may order tests, such as blood work, neurological exams and brain imaging (such as a CT or MRI scan).

COMMON WARNING SIGNS

  • Diminished judgment and planning
  • Inability to pay attention
  • Difficulty in social situations
  • Struggling to find the right words

What Should I Expect As A Caregiver?

For caregivers, understanding common behavior changes of someone living with Vascular dementia is important. A caregiver may need to provide emotional and physical support, as well as encouragement. Individuals with dementia are likely to become restless, experience mood changes and wander. Knowing how to balance a person’s safety and independence becomes more difficult as the disease progresses.

How Can We Help?

Meeting the demands of a loved one with Vascular Dementia can be difficult and seem impossible. Memory care is all we do. We offer the following services dedicated to those living with memory impairments.

  • Support, education and information for caregivers and family members.
  • An environment that helps to keep residents safe and as independent as possible.
  • Staff specially trained on caring for residents living with memory loss.
  • Structured, engaging programs, 10 hours a day.
  • Programs personalized for all levels of dementia and focused on what the resident can do, capitalizing on lifelong experiences and familiar routines.

Overview

Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), or poststroke dementia, is estimated to be the second most common form of dementia behind Alzheimer’s disease. Individuals who suffer from vascular dementia experience a wide variety of symptoms, many of which are shared with Alzheimer’s disease, including memory loss, confusion and disorientation.

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  • Hospice care is a type of health care that focuses on the palliation of a terminally ill patient’s pain and symptoms and attending to their emotional and spiritual needs at the end of life. Hospice care prioritizes comfort and quality of life by reducing pain and suffering. Hospice care provides an alternative to therapies focused on life-prolonging measures that may be arduous, likely to cause more symptoms, or are not aligned with a person’s goals.

  • Respite stay is a short-term stay at Iuditas’ Memory Care. A temporary stay can provide the opportunity to experience the community on a trial basis, while giving a current caregiver a break or aid in the recovery after a hospital stay.

    Common reasons for a respite stay include:

    Current caregiver needs a break or is going on vacation

    Loss of current part-time caregiver and time is needed to organize a new caregiver

    A trial run for a loved on before committing to becoming a full-time resident

    A place to get stronger after a hospital or skilled nursing stay

    Our goal is to earn your loved one’s trust through personalized care in a joyful boutique-style memory care community. We encourage independence while offering top-rated amenities and activities in support of each resident’s lifestyle.

    • Care
    • Purpose
    • Happiness